Yucca

Yucca tendril details, CanyonLands N.P

Yucca Plants are common and well adapted to the conditions in CanyonLands and the deserts of South West. The native people who lived in this area once used the hardy yucca plants to make everything from ropes to baskets to even clothing and sandals!

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19 thoughts on “Yucca

      • You know I don’t. I am always one of the last few persons to join any ‘new’ social media. I do have a fb account though..One of these days I will want to sign up twitter though.

        Silly Question: give me a strong compelling reason to still tweet when i already facebook :) ?

        • And it seems I also missed this comment, forgetting to check to follow-up comments box.

          Hmm … a compelling reason to tweet? I’m not sure exactly. I also have a Facebook account, but use it much less that I used to for various reasons. Perhaps a good old ‘friend’ cull is in order? But I’m also getting fed up with the privacy changes, or perhaps I should say, privacy invasions! I guess a short answer is: Facebook is more personal, Twitter is more networking. Although they each have both aspects.

            • :) I have often missed comment replies earlier .. wordpress needs to have a feature where you can get notifications on comments you left on other blogs. As a workaround i use the ‘Comments I’ve made’ menu which shows the last few posts you commented on which works for low traffic day. Have you tried that ?

  1. It is almost hard to believe it is a plant !! It looks like something related to wires, the Internet, web2.0 …. never knew the yucca plant looked like this ! I love the way it looks in B&W ….

    • i should have let the viewers guess what it is :) that way it would be more fun. I agree that monochrome and the top-down perspective and shallow depth of field have all rendered this abstract. hanks for your comments

    • Thanks David. i had accidently captured it as monochrome and liked the result on LCD so i knew i had to convert to bnw later.

      the lines,shapes and the contrast of the milky white ‘tendrils'(learnt a new word thanks to a previous comment) against the dark background all made a case for trying B&W here

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